Thursday, March 23, 2017

Part III of the Breaking Up Series: Leaving the Past Behind You

In this final installment of my Breaking Up series, I want to talk about what a new board needs to do to get out from under the legacy left behind from an old board, particularly when that legacy is not a positive one. 

"The secret of change is to focus all of your energy, not on fighting the old, but on building the new." 

Some new boards find that they need to depart entirely from the manner in which the association had previously been operated.  This is especially true when a prior board had been in place for a long time.
Some of the unpleasant discoveries that new boards may make include:
  1. A pattern of signing unfavorable service contracts which were never reviewed by legal counsel and which now bind the association for many years without any possibility for early extrication.
  2. The failure to routinely and consistently enforce important provisions in the governing documents.
  3. A disorganized jumble of association books and records which makes swift and successful document inspections unlikely.
  4. Large delinquencies which have not been properly handled.
When I meet with boards who are confronting the foregoing problems, my first piece of advice is to look forward and focus on setting better patterns in place. Typically, the only exception to this advice is if a crime or fraud was perpetrated by prior board members in which case we discuss all legal and criminal options available to the Board.

In terms of cleaning up the problems inherited from a previous board, the following steps can help put a healthier pattern in place:
  1. Have association counsel review all existing contracts; renegotiate when possible and send out termination notices for those no longer desirable contracts where are up for renewal or for which a verifiable breach exists.
  2. Just because a previous board has failed to enforce certain use restrictions does not mean subsequent boards are forever barred from doing so.  A new board can undertake a process known as "republication" which allows you to once again enforce overlooked restrictions by sending out proper notice of your intention to do so. Please speak with your association attorney to discuss the proper steps to take in order to accomplish this republication process.
  3. Work to digitize your books and records, create an association website if you don't already have one or update the one you do have and upload those newly digitized records to your website. The more organized and transparent you make your operations, the easier your board's job will be.
  4. Large balances are much more difficult to collect than small ones. New boards should discuss their existing collection policy with counsel and decide what is and is not working. You want to strike the right balance between not allowing a delinquency to balloon out of control while not being too harsh in terms of your policy.  Speaking of counsel, assess whether or not your current attorney is proceeding expeditiously with your collections or is part of the problem.
Perhaps the most difficult aspect of breaking free from a prior board is the fact that in many communities the previous board members remain residents in the community and often become very vocal critics of their successors. Moreover, a board is often not overhauled entirely but in a piecemeal fashion which means holdovers from the "old days" may become an impediment to changing the association's culture since they are usually fans of "business as usual".

Change is usually not easy but in the association context, it can make a world of difference when it comes to the board's ability to move critically important projects forward and resident satisfaction.

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