Monday, June 8, 2015

12 Angry Men-Classic Movie or Average Association Master Board Meeting?


Last night I watched a classic American film-12 Angry Men. The title actually refers to the twelve jurors deliberating the fate of a boy on trial for murdering his father but could just as easily describe the average master association board of directors. 

I am sure many of my blog readers have seen this movie but for those who haven't, the entire film takes place in a hot, stuffy jury room. Henry Fonda starts out as the lone hold-out with his Not Guilty vote and he faces the wrath of his fellow jurors who want to get to a ball game, their jobs or their homes and do not appreciate his dissenting voice delaying their escape from their confined quarters.

At one point, a juror accuses Fonda of being talented at the "soft sell" negotiation technique. Fonda doesn't attempt to shout, scream or bully in order to get his fellow jurors to slow down in their rush to judgment. Instead, he bravely admits that he doesn't know whether or not the boy is guilty but he would like to talk about it a little and ask some questions before rendering a verdict which will end the boy's life. Eventually the discussion results in the other jurors realizing that the evidence they had relied on so heavily and hastily could not support a guilty verdict and an unanimous acquittal results.

While the decisions made in association board meetings are not nearly so significant, those decisions still can impact the quality of life for many people.   How often has a member of a community association board felt that the rationale being expressed by some or the majority of his or her fellow directors was not in the community's best interests but remained silent for fear of being rebuked or rejected? Conversely, how many directors do stand up and voice their concerns but do it in such a hostile manner that their message is drowned out by their rhetoric? Association members can also be the right messengers at times when a majority mindset needs to change.

There are a lot of lessons to be learned from 12 Angry Men for the many thousands of volunteers serving on community association boards. 

  • Speak up, especially if the stakes are high. 
  • Present your message in a way that makes your fellow directors really hear what you are saying. 
  • The way to unmask the extreme members of your board is by giving them enough room to do that task themselves in the face of unemotional data.
If you haven't seen the movie in a while or have never seen it, perhaps it's time for movie night in your community.

2 comments:

  1. Donna - Thanks for reminding me of that great classic movie. The cast included some of the finest actors of all time, including Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Jack Warden, Martin Balsam, Jack Klugman and E. G. Marshall. Not many movies today can hold your attention like that one!

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  2. I am a condo conflict engagement specialist, a mediator, circle keeper, conflict coach, and Nonviolent Communication trainer, here in Chicago, and I liked this post quite a bit, and would like to reproduce it on my on blog, post it on my own blog. Congratulations Ms DiMaggio Berger.

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